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Thread started 10/04/18 11:21pm

hausofmoi7

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Identity Politics Matter

I think that identity politics is the most radical and revolutionary act.
When society is criticised from the perspective of the most marginalised in society it offers an indictment that is uniquely all encompassing as it comes from the very bottom.
I think that dismissing identity politics as self serving and ultimately politically ineffective is inaccurate.
Identity Politics by oppressed and marginalised groups is inherently revolutionary and radical.



Angela Davis on Feminism, Communism and being a Black Panther






.
[Edited 10/5/18 4:20am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #1 posted 10/05/18 1:06am

hausofmoi7

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Black Nationalist Women and Global Visions of Freedom
https://truthout.org/arti...f-freedom/

The #MeToo movement in the United States is one of the contemporary expressions of women’s political power and evidence of women’s commitment to dismantling systems of oppression that give rise to sexual harassment and assault. The fact that a Black woman founded the movement is not surprising; especially considering the crucial role Black women have always played in shaping US and global politics.

During the 20th century, a dynamic group of Black nationalist women similarly resisted all forms of harassment and discrimination. At a moment in which people of African descent were being denied full citizenship and human rights, these women were at the forefront of Black political movements.

One of the most important aspects of these women’s political vision was their commitment to Black internationalism. Building upon a long and rich tradition and history dating back to the age of revolution, Black nationalist women maintained a global racial consciousness and commitment to universal emancipation. They understood that the struggle for Black rights in the United States, as well as the fight for Black political self-determination, could not be divorced from the global struggles for freedom in Asia, Europe, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and other parts of the globe.

To that end, Black nationalist women employed various strategies and tactics and utilized numerous avenues to disseminate global visions of freedom and build transnational alliances with other people of color across the globe. In the 1930s and 1940s, Black nationalist Mittie Maude Lena Gordon used her organization, the Peace Movement of Ethiopia (PME), as a platform for advancing Black internationalism. While advocating for Black relocation to Liberia — to escape racism and dissemination in the United States and unite people of African descent in the diaspora — Gordon also worked to advance the cause of universal Black liberation. Through her writings during this period, which circulated in Black nationalist circles in the United States and abroad, Gordon condemned imperialism, calling for all European colonies to be “free of all whites.”

From her base in Chicago, she worked to build transnational alliances with a diverse group of activists. Her efforts to collaborate with Nigerian nationalist Akweke Abyssinia Nwafor Orizu during the early 1940s further exemplify her support for the anti-colonial movements of this period. Orizu would later become acting president of Nigeria in the 1960s. A staunch proponent of African liberation from European colonialism, Orizu worked alongside other African students studying in the United States during the 1940s, including Kwame Nkrumah, future prime minister of Ghana.

In December 1940, after reading about Orizu in the Richmond Times, Gordon invited him to speak before an audience of PME supporters. For 10 days in March 1941, Orizu held a series of public meetings with Gordon and her supporters addressing a range of topics, including African history, emigration and African independence.

The outbreak of World War II marked a turning point in Black nationalist women’s political activism. Like many other Black activists during this period, Black nationalist women viewed the war as a pivotal opportunity for people of color to confront global white supremacy and secure economic and political freedom. Writing in 1942, Gordon reflected on the challenges that Indians endured under European colonialism and staunchly declared, “When India is free all colonial people and subjects throughout the world will be free.” In a subsequent letter, she emphasized the link between the challenges facing African descended people and the plight of Indians. “The complete freedom of India will bring complete freedom to the American Black people, because the same men are holding them in slavery,” she argued.

Throughout the United States, many Black nationalist women shared Gordon’s internationalist vision. In 1942, Josephine Moody, a member of Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) in Cleveland, Ohio, called for an immediate overthrow of the global white power structure. “The bleeding wound of Africa is wide open,” Moody argued, “and the nations of the world keep the wound from healing, and we, the Negro must be our own physician to effect a healing of that wound.” The liberation of Africa, Moody continued, would only come by force: “We want to set the world on fire, we want freedom and justice and a chance to build for ourselves. And if we must set the world on fire … we will, like other men, die for the realization of our dreams.”

The ideas expressed in Moody’s article informed Black nationalist women’s political praxis during the 20th century. This was certainly the case for Amy Ashwood Garvey, the first wife of Marcus Garvey, who helped to establish the UNIA in Jamaica in 1914. Like many other Black nationalist women during the 20th century, Ashwood maintained a commitment to Black internationalism. In her extensive travels throughout the United States and other parts of the globe, Ashwood actively pursued diverse political alliances, often crossing racial, geographical and gender lines. At the 1944 “Conference on Africa – New Perspectives,” organized by the Council of African Affairs (CAA), Ashwood endorsed Black internationalism, arguing that Black people needed to “broaden our vision and broaden our policy to include other groups of people who have been suffering as we have suffered.”

Expressing similar views, Amy Jacques Garvey — Marcus Garvey’s second wife and Black nationalist leader — articulated a vision of Black internationalism. “The ties of blood that bind us transcends all national boundaries,” she argued in a 1945 article. “The differences of languages and dialects are being overcome,” she added, “as all of us are learning the language of freedom.”

Her comments captured the global visions of Black nationalist women in the 20th century. Through shared strategies of resistance and transnational collaborations, these women worked to secure Black economic and political freedom. For these activists, Black internationalism was the ultimate key to dismantling racism, imperialism and global white supremacy.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #2 posted 10/05/18 1:54am

hausofmoi7

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FROM AL QAWS: A DECADE OF BUILDING A QUEER PALESTINIAN DISCOURSE
https://ilga.org/signpost...-discourse

Like it or not, the Palestinian LGBTQ movement is part of the political cause, even if it did not actively participate in the fight against the symbols of colonialism and occupation -which do not distinguish between gay and straight. Its cause and name have become hostages of political games. The biggest example to that is how the Israeli government uses LGBTQs rights and tarnishes Palestinian LGBTQs’ image to pinkwash its crimes against the Palestinian people.
[Edited 10/5/18 2:17am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #3 posted 10/05/18 2:16am

hausofmoi7

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.
[Edited 10/5/18 2:18am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #4 posted 10/05/18 5:07am

hausofmoi7

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Is this to be the brave new gay world? A world in which the public face of the queer community -- the gay, the white, the cisgender and the wealthy -- take their place among society's elite, leaving the transgender, the non-white, the poor and the homeless to fend for themselves?

https://www.google.com.au...825158/amp

On the evening of June 28, two very different celebrations took place to mark the most historic New York City Pride week in decades.

The flashier of these celebrations was the iconic Dance on the Pier. As the Pride Parade came to a drizzly end, an exuberant crowd of young, gay and mostly white men made their way to Hudson River Park's Pier 26, where Ariana Grande headlined a big-budget outdoor mega-party. Complete with laser lights, multiple jumbotrons, fireworks and a legion of half-naked go-go dancers, the event was a brazen testament to the newfound trendiness of urban gaydom. Admission started at $80, but that didn't stop 10,000 enthusiastic fans from snatching up tickets to what organizers billed as one of the world's top-tier LGBT events.

If any of those 10,000 attendees had taken a break from the dancing and glanced across the Hudson to the north, they may have seen the outline of the Christopher Street Piers, where a celebration of a very different kind was taking place. Here, a motley crowd of queer homeless youths -- who definitely could not afford admission to Dance on the Pier -- decided to throw an impromptu party of their own. With the bass from the Ariana Grande concert pulsing in the background, the youths -- male, female, cisgender, transgender, gay, lesbian, bisexual, black and Latino -- drank, smoked, sang, vogued and played cards under the dim light of the street lamps.

Both parties paid homage to a common past by celebrating Pride and the decades of struggle it commemorates. Both parties acknowledged a common present by sharing space on the Hudson River Piers, the heart of New York's LGBT community. But the extravagant Ariana Grande concert and its upscale audience could not have seemed more out of place among the piers that have served as a safe haven for the queer community's most marginalized -- mostly queer homeless youth of color -- for decades.

And this growing rift between mainstream and marginalized LGBT people makes me fear that our community won't have a common future.

While the gay rights movement in the United States has achieved a remarkable string of successes over the past several years, including the invalidation of the Defense of Marriage Act and the legalization of gay marriage, not everyone within the LGBT community is equally positioned to take advantage of these successes.

After all, although marriage is a declaration of love, in many ways it is also an expression of interpersonal stability, economic security and social respectability -- attributes that many marginalized LGBT people do not have. So while love may have won for middle and upper class gays, many transgender people, queer people of color and queer homeless youths instead find themselves left behind by a community that has become increasingly defined by the interests of its white, cisgender, middle and upper class members.

Over a decade ago, this powerful subsection of the LGBT community decided that the fight for marriage equality would be the modern cornerstone of the gay rights movement -- and for good reason. Marriage is an institution of respectability. The fight for gay marriage suggested that the gay community had grown up, left its radical past behind and was ready to join mainstream society as a reputable partner. It dismantled the hypersexual, flamboyant gay stereotype and replaced it with a more wholesome image that mainstream America found more palatable.


It was also an assertion that the gay rights movement had reached an important milestone, transcending basic issues of health, safety, economic security and social stability.

But the problem is, it hadn't. Over 20 percent of all LGBT youth are homeless, and 40 percent of all homeless youth are LGBT. 58 percent of queer homeless youth have been sexually assaulted. 64 percent of transgender people make less than $25,000 per year. 41 percent of transgender people and 62 percent of queer homeless youth have attempted suicide. And 10 transgender women have been murdered in the U.S. so far this year.

And yet, as middle and upper class gays poured time and money into the fight for gay marriage, these and other less marketable LGBT issues were largely forgotten. The number of queer youths on the streets rose. Violence against transgender people increased. And the gap between the 'mainstream' queer community and its fringes grew. As one gay, black and homeless youth on Pier 45 told me, "It's like once they had marriage equality it's like, 'Nah, we don't feel your pain any more, sorry.'"

Is this to be the brave new gay world?


A world in which the public face of the queer community -- the gay, the white, the cisgender and the wealthy -- take their place among society's elite, leaving the transgender, the non-white, the poor and the homeless to fend for themselves?


A world where queer youths are disowned and thrown out on the street by their families, only to find that they are also considered second-class citizens in the community they reach out to for love and acceptance?

A world of partition, indifference, neglect and self-interest?

Unfortunately, this dystopia has already started to become reality. As 'mainstream' white gay culture has become not only socially accepted, but also widely marketed and commercialized, middle and upper class gay interests have become inseparably intertwined with the gentrification of historically gay spaces and the criminalization of poor, non-white, transgender and homeless individuals within these spaces.

For example, Greenwich Village -- long a refuge for queer youths fleeing rejection and persecution -- has become a shining showcase for the gay community's newfound prosperity, complete with organic juice bars, small dog boutiques and seemingly hundreds of overpriced coffee shops. And as the gay elite have become increasingly integrated into the power structure of society, many have used their newfound influence not to alleviate the inequalities within the queer community, but instead to cement their position at the pinnacle of an expanding LGBT hierarchy.

Instead of collaborating with queer homeless youth to recreate the old Village's culture of diversity and acceptance, many residents of this new Greenwich Village -- many of them gay and lesbian -- have sought to "clean" their streets of the "Bloods and Crips", "gangs of unruly youths" and "gay youth of African-American and Hispanic origin" - all seemingly references to queer homeless youth of color.

Instead of proudly embracing the Christopher Street Piers' rich history as a haven for disowned queer homeless youths, some residents have tried to eject the youths from the piers altogether, arguing that times have changed and queer youth no longer need safe spaces.

And instead of protecting queer homeless youths from harassment, the Christopher Street Patrol has increasingly hounded them for petty quality of life infractions, a strategy eerily similar to that of the anti-gay vigilantes the patrol was in part founded to combat. As one black transgender youth put it, "The damage comes from our own community. You'd think we'd be safe on our own piers."

But the worst part about this trend is that because the discrimination is perpetrated at least in part by our own community, it is given a sense of legitimacy. After all, it can't be homophobic if it's queers versus queers, right?!

With the stunning advances in gay rights and growing prosperity of America's LGB community over the past decade, it's easy to forget that the very groups we are now marginalizing are the ones who launched the queer rights movement at a time when being gay was still a crime.

If queer homeless youths, black drag queens, transgender women and gay hustlers had not risen up against oppression at Compton's Cafeteria and Stonewall over 45 years ago, we would not have gay marriage today. Our movement was built on the back of our community's margins. So as long as LGBT youths sleep on the street, transgender people fear for their lives, and queer people of color live in poverty, my new right to marry will be diminished.

The LGBT movement still has a long way to go; I just hope the next big battle for queer rights isn't against the queer community itself.





.
[Edited 10/5/18 5:19am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #5 posted 10/05/18 7:23am

2freaky4church
1

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Neoliberals hijacked them. Best to listen to Adolph Reed.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #6 posted 10/05/18 10:18am

poppys

hausofmoi7 said:

I think that identity politics is the most radical and revolutionary act. When society is criticised from the perspective of the most marginalised in society it offers an indictment that is uniquely all encompassing as it comes from the very bottom.

I think that dismissing identity politics as self serving and ultimately politically ineffective is inaccurate. Identity Politics by oppressed and marginalised groups is inherently revolutionary and radical.
Angela Davis on Feminism, Communism and being a Black Panther . [Edited 10/5/18 4:20am]


Agree. Identity Politics is just another rebranding of an old struggle, the struggle for human rights. It isn't going away, it's never going away. Just because some people don't like that and are using the name as some sort of bludgeon to shame us into not grouping together over like issues is not even a thing in the first place. I guess everyone who wants to achieve equality should all stay separate while the people who are against it band together. Give me a break.

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Reply #7 posted 10/08/18 11:26am

namepeace

poppys said:

hausofmoi7 said:

I think that identity politics is the most radical and revolutionary act. When society is criticised from the perspective of the most marginalised in society it offers an indictment that is uniquely all encompassing as it comes from the very bottom.

I think that dismissing identity politics as self serving and ultimately politically ineffective is inaccurate. Identity Politics by oppressed and marginalised groups is inherently revolutionary and radical.
Angela Davis on Feminism, Communism and being a Black Panther . [Edited 10/5/18 4:20am]


Agree. Identity Politics is just another rebranding of an old struggle, the struggle for human rights. It isn't going away, it's never going away. Just because some people don't like that and are using the name as some sort of bludgeon to shame us into not grouping together over like issues is not even a thing in the first place. I guess everyone who wants to achieve equality should all stay separate while the people who are against it band together. Give me a break.


Those who use the term derisively practice identity politics because they perfected identity politics.

With the Southern Strategy, the Right drew identity politics' bright line of "us" v. "them." They did so by not so much specifically identifying the "us", but villainizing the "them." Blacks, browns, immigrants, social progressives, feminists, "intellectuals" and "elites" were and remain their targets.

The coalitions you're talking about were built not just out of affinity, but also in the interests of self-preservation.

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #8 posted 10/08/18 12:30pm

poppys

Yes, that is true. But we are a little tired of always hearing about the Southern Strategy. It's an old saw, and another way Northerners think they are more egalitarian - they're really not - or they wouldn't be constantly referring to the Southern Strategy. There are far more People Of Color living in "The South" than in "The North", then and now. Let's just start there.

Also "The South" includes such diverse states as Maryland, Virgina, Kentucky, Texas, Arkansas and Florida, in addition to the usual suspects - not to mention if Washington DC were a state. JFK's famous quote is Washington is a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm. It's a joke, by the way, for those who are overly literal. The Gulf (Dirty) Coast is an area all it's own with unique markers, accents and people even though it spans Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida - 5 states. That was the highway to the area, along with the rivers, long before roads were built.

Let's not forget that Robert E Lee graduated from West Point in New York AND was appointed Superintendent there in 1852, a position he loathed to take calling it a "snake pit" - but he obeyed the War Department. His grandfather was a Revolutionary War officer.

I also used to generalize about "The South" before I actually lived here, I was born in Ohio. It's so much different than many in "The North" think it is - in multiple and diverse ways. The problems can be more in your face, but in many ways people get along better because they have to, at least where I live.


[Edited 10/9/18 7:39am]

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Reply #9 posted 10/09/18 7:31am

poppys


https://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/10/magazine/10Section2b.t-4.html


Even thought this is an older book review article, it still gives SOME nuance to what people in "The South" are really like. They are just like people in "The North" for the most part. The gist of it is that even with all the racial aspects of the Southern Strategy, people still voted their pocketbooks when it came down to it.

Last night Little Wayne performed the Saints half-time show. He and his people are from a neighborhood called Hollygrove which was part of the McCarty (an Irishman) Plantation way back in the day. People tend to stay-put in New Orleans. One of the reasons the diaspora of Katrina was such a hardship. My neighbor's great-grandfather built the house she still lives in, in 1873, after the Civil War when POC could buy land. He was quite a successful businessman of his time.

Anyway, Little Wayne's last name is Carter. Guessing it's from from McCarty although I don't know his geneology. Suffice it to say he is far more famous and wealthy than McCarty ever was, or could ever dream of being.

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Reply #10 posted 10/09/18 7:39am

hausofmoi7

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Poppy, Many people of colour can’t vote though.
If they did it would not only mean that republicans would be out of business, but that Democrats would probably be forced to go left.

.
[Edited 10/9/18 14:04pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #11 posted 10/09/18 8:04am

poppys

hausofmoi7 said:

Poppy, Many people of colour can’t vote though. If they did it would probably not only mean that republicans would be out of business, but Democrats would be forced go left. Alow people of colour to vote. No one one should speak for them.


What does anything I have said mean I am not allowing people of color to vote? I know what you are saying. I am old and have spent my life reaching across that gap. You are preaching to the choir, baby. You are young and idealistic, I get that, but you will never force things the way you think in the bolded sentence above. Many people of color (and white people too) who CAN vote, DON'T vote. Do you understand that? There are SO many reasons why.

I live in a city that is 65% African-American with an extremely organized voter base. People who could not live in their homes after Katrina were bussed in by various groups so as not to lose their voting status. We now have our first FEMALE mayor. She is also black, which is not a first. You read all your books and materials, that's fine. I'm trying to expand your knowledge of the reality of 2018 beyond what you read on the internet from ouside this country.

The struggle for equal voting rights is ongoing, beyond our lifetimes. There are many ways to thwart voters besides with laws, and I have written about them right here in the org P&R. Yet you continue with the same hammer, the same way. Some of us are VERY aware of what is going on and participate actively to change it. You need to expand your dogma at the very least, that's what real activism and progress is about. It is a living thing.

And now I have to get to work, but I'll check back in.

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Reply #12 posted 10/09/18 8:13am

hausofmoi7

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That’s true Poppy.
Many people who can vote do not.
If they did, you are right, it would be a very different political conversation.
I don’t disagree with you here.


.
[Edited 10/9/18 14:12pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #13 posted 10/09/18 8:19am

namepeace

poppys said:

Yes, that is true. But we are a little tired of always hearing about the Southern Strategy. It's an old saw, and another way Northerners think they are more egalitarian - they're really not - or they wouldn't be constantly referring to the Southern Strategy. There are far more People Of Color living in "The South" than in "The North", then and now. Let's just start there.

Also "The South" includes such diverse states as Maryland, Virgina, Kentucky, Texas, Arkansas and Florida, in addition to the usual suspects - not to mention if Washington DC were a state. JFK's famous quote is Washington is a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm. It's a joke, by the way, for those who are overly literal. The Gulf (Dirty) Coast is an area all it's own with unique markers, accents and people even though it spans Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida - 5 states. That was the highway to the area, along with the rivers, long before roads were built.

Let's not forget that Robert E Lee graduated from West Point in New York AND was appointed Superintendent there in 1852, a position he loathed to take calling it a "snake pit" - but he obeyed the War Department. His grandfather was a Revolutionary War officer.

I also used to generalize about "The South" before I actually lived here, I was born in Ohio. It's so much different than many in "The North" think it is - in multiple and diverse ways. The problems can be more in your face, but in many ways people get along better because they have to, at least where I live.


[Edited 10/9/18 7:39am]


1. I am a lifelong Southerner. I'm well aware of the complexities of my region.

2. The Southern Strategy is a national one, not a regional one. It was employed to build a coalition of voters across the country, and was employed to great effect to build national coalitions for Republicans for 50 years. Trump is employing it right now to great effect. We may tire of hearing it, but it's with us still.

twocents

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #14 posted 10/09/18 9:25am

hausofmoi7

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Identity Politics Matter




Malalai Joya
Anti imperialist Afghani feminist





https://www.greenleft.org...war-terror


Afghan anti-war activist and feminist Malalai Joya sent the solidarity message below to a protest organised by Sydney Stop the War Coalition against the visit of US Vice President Mike Pence to Australia on April 29.

Joya was elected to Afghanistan’s National Assembly of Afghanistan from 2005 until early 2007. She was dismissed from her seat for denouncing the presence of warlords and war criminals in the Afghan Parliament.

* * *

I am very sorry to say that, after more than 15 years of the so-called war on terror by US-NATO forces and their spending of tens of billions of dollars, the news from Afghanistan is disastrous.

Today, the men and women in my country are not liberated at all: we still suffer from the fascism of fundamentalism of different brands and an occupation by the US and NATO forces.

I have said in the past, again and again, that the root cause of the problems of my country is occupation and fundamentalism. What I have said in the past has all come true.

Sadly, our country still tops the list as drug producing, corrupt, illiterate, unhappy and misogynist and war-affected. The genocide in our country is no less brutal now than it was during the horror of the Taliban era. The occupation has only added to our problems.

There is no need for me to describe the condition of Afghanistan in detail, except to say that the wave of asylum seekers to Europe and other countries are mostly young people who take big risks. They then arrive and have to face more terrible political, economic and social conditions.

Millions of Afghans suffer from insecurity, poverty, joblessness, addiction, oppression and tyranny. More than 85% suffer from some sort of depression and mental disorders. More than 3 million from a total population of 30 million are addicted to drugs. The number is growing every day.

Western governments are clearly responsible for Afghanistan’s catastrophe: the wave of terrorism and the millions of asylum seekers are the outcome of these past 15 years of wrongdoing in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Yemen and elsewhere.

As more than 60% of Afghans are jobless and destitute, they either join the Taliban, ISIS or other terrorist groups who pay up to US$600 per month to their fighters. Those who are deported from the West get addicted or join the ranks of the terrorists to survive.

I strongly condemn the Western governments’ anti-asylum seeker policies. Human rights values, international conventions and, most importantly, the major role they played in this crisis, oblige them to help those in need. They must follow international laws governing refugees.

The so-called war on terror is the biggest lie of the century.

In Afghanistan, we see how the US and NATO still directly and indirectly support and arm the most dangerous terrorists.

“Anti-terrorism” is still a strategic weapon in the hands of the White House; it is being used to destabilise Asia and block the economic and military progress of Russia, China and other potential US rivals.

Many of you may have heard about the so-called Mother of All Bombs (MOAB), the biggest non-nuclear US bomb that was recently dropped in Achin district of Nangarhar.

The claim that the target of this bomb was ISIS is a big lie because I don’t believe the US wants to destroy the Taliban, ISIS and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan. Rather, it has contributed to nurturing this deadly virus in our country all these years.

The MOAB was dropped to test the most deadly weapon on our society and send a message to Russia, Iran, China and other rivals that the US has its most destructive bombs in its bases in Afghanistan, and can use them whenever it wishes.

The bombs and arms used by the US and NATO over the 16 years of occupation have contained radioactive elements. These have contaminated our environment and led to a terrifying rise in the rates of birth defects among children in the war-torn areas. In many areas, agriculture has also suffered.

The US has dropped bombs containing white phosphorous and depleted uranium on our people and it has also led to terrible environmental destruction.

The puppet government of Kabul gave the Pentagon a green light for committing these crimes and carrying out such tests when it signed the shameful strategic agreement with the US. In reality, our country has become the laboratory of the US-NATO war machine, and once again the site of conflict between the superpowers.

We are worried that Afghanistan will become the site of the superpowers’ arms race and sink deeper into war, destruction and misfortune.

As long as our country is occupied by the US and NATO, we will not have security and stability.

What Martin Luther King said 50 years ago remains true: the current US system is the biggest purveyor of violence and terrorism in history.

Over the decades of war, progressive forces and individuals in Afghanistan have resisted occupation and struggled against fundamentalism. This is our hope for the future of Afghanistan. Your solidarity and support always gave me more hope and courage to continue with this struggle.

Unfortunately, the US-NATO war and military invasions have turned the world into a bloodbath and we can even expect World War III if they are not stopped.

Stopping these savage wars and brutalities and establishing world peace is the moral responsibility of every conscious citizen of the world.





.
[Edited 10/9/18 14:51pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #15 posted 10/09/18 12:07pm

poppys

namepeace said:

poppys said:

Yes, that is true. But we are a little tired of always hearing about the Southern Strategy. It's an old saw, and another way Northerners think they are more egalitarian - they're really not - or they wouldn't be constantly referring to the Southern Strategy. There are far more People Of Color living in "The South" than in "The North", then and now. Let's just start there.

Also "The South" includes such diverse states as Maryland, Virgina, Kentucky, Texas, Arkansas and Florida, in addition to the usual suspects - not to mention if Washington DC were a state. JFK's famous quote is Washington is a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm. It's a joke, by the way, for those who are overly literal. The Gulf (Dirty) Coast is an area all it's own with unique markers, accents and people even though it spans Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida - 5 states. That was the highway to the area, along with the rivers, long before roads were built.

Let's not forget that Robert E Lee graduated from West Point in New York AND was appointed Superintendent there in 1852, a position he loathed to take calling it a "snake pit" - but he obeyed the War Department. His grandfather was a Revolutionary War officer.

I also used to generalize about "The South" before I actually lived here, I was born in Ohio. It's so much different than many in "The North" think it is - in multiple and diverse ways. The problems can be more in your face, but in many ways people get along better because they have to, at least where I live.



1. I am a lifelong Southerner. I'm well aware of the complexities of my region.

2. The Southern Strategy is a national one, not a regional one. It was employed to build a coalition of voters across the country, and was employed to great effect to build national coalitions for Republicans for 50 years. Trump is employing it right now to great effect. We may tire of hearing it, but it's with us still.

twocents


I feel it needs to be emphasized as national when speaking of it, that's what my post was about. Maybe you're hip to the complexities, being a lifelong Southerner. For many people, all they hear is the word Southern and think that doesn't involve them as it IS a regional and/or directional title.

I have had the experience of living in quite a few places in the States, and the Caribbean, which is a whole 'nother story and quite unlike the US. As far as I know, everything a person writes here is their two cents.

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Reply #16 posted 10/09/18 12:13pm

namepeace

poppys said:

namepeace said:


1. I am a lifelong Southerner. I'm well aware of the complexities of my region.

2. The Southern Strategy is a national one, not a regional one. It was employed to build a coalition of voters across the country, and was employed to great effect to build national coalitions for Republicans for 50 years. Trump is employing it right now to great effect. We may tire of hearing it, but it's with us still.

twocents


I feel it needs to be emphasized as national when speaking of it, that's what my post was about. Maybe you're hip to the complexities, being a lifelong Southerner. For many people, all they hear is the word Southern and think that doesn't involve them as it IS a regional and/or directional title.

I have had the experience of living in quite a few places in the States, and the Caribbean, which is a whole 'nother story and quite unlike the US. As far as I know, everything a person writes here is their two cents.


Yeah, thanks.

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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